Miles of smiles

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I have a husky collie cross and she’s one of the most loving, loyal dogs I’ve ever had, and I’ve had many. If you adopt him this boy will be your best friend for sure…

bumpyroadtobubba

Miles

This handsome guy came up in my news feed and I had two options:

  1. adopt him;
  2. help him find a fabulous new home.

Despite my falling for Miles immediately, I know I can’t have another dog. I am also a pathetic failure as a foster mumma {just ask Beary}. So, helping him find a fabulous new home it is. Miles currently lives in Sydney.

Sadly his family {who love him dearly} need to find him a new home. They have spent a lot of time {a LOT of time} thinking about this and have come to this heartbreaking decision as their life circumstances have changed meaning they can’t be the forever family they had hoped to be. They are committed to finding him a loving home though, so I thought I’d do my best to help.

Miles is a four-year old border collie cross husky. He was the result of an accidental {spay…

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Yet ANOTHER good dog’s life put to risk…

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I sat browsing my facebook page, Joe’s legacy tonight and my heart stopped. Just over a year since our beautiful Border Collie died and I was faced with a spine chilling picture like this……………….

Right there on the page originally set up as tribute to Joe. There right in front of me on the screen was a beautiful Border Collie, not unlike my Joe in looks, sat on a vet table with a HUGE stick piercing right through his chest.

“OH MY GOODNESS, when will this stop?” I gasped.

The link is below.  Please – if you love dogs, even if you don’t own one, STOP using sticks as toys.  I have begged, posted, written all about it, there are facebook pages and websites, vets comments, newspaper articles, yet still people throw a stick, a harmless doggy game.  It’s NOT harmless.

I don’t know statistics but I’m sure they’re out there somewhere. The thing is, whether 1 in a hundred injuries from sticks or 1 in a million – ONE IS TOO MANY when it’s preventable by not doing it. Dog’s die – they break bones, they get ran over, they choke… there are things we cannot protect them from, but we can stop using sticks because we’re lazy, or thoughtless, or naive… there’s no hardship to take a ball, or a favourite toy and throw it.

I’ve said it before and I’ll repeat it “If you know a toy will harm a child you prevent the child from having it.  Why then do we ignore this common sense when it comes to our dogs?”

Please, look at the links – and at the very least think twice… and share if you care.

https://www.facebook.com/tierrettung.straubing.de/photos/pcb.1580550875512624/1580550652179313/?type=1&theater

Don’t let another good dog die needlessly.

People, will you help me make 2015 a successful “adopt a dog” year – starting with Barclay?

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1526692_677383665677653_6663460059332561827_n 1560377_677382902344396_5086657628063043118_n 10347550_676676825748337_1670451297678106344_n 10354746_677383002344386_4212220724363150069_n 10386374_677382965677723_5026700245163824220_n 10397828_677383045677715_8908846584403216859_n 10450619_677383155677704_4649751668990548563_n 10468444_676676819081671_3739223618037531223_n 10479038_676676809081672_5375902108536473916_n 10501996_677383142344372_969163760937880441_n 10511326_677383019011051_4541310886622395580_n 10527477_677382915677728_3574800617665713888_n 10533557_677383095677710_5127863937145937771_n 10551066_677382892344397_6347126878314820982_n 10556253_677383099011043_1607866339929155718_n 10569020_677383145677705_6354479876672783027_n 10574273_677383179011035_6134260640237222982_n 10580101_677382945677725_8732664782766313107_n 10583960_676676862415000_3555478269038867074_n 10599139_677383062344380_1013354206756260578_n barclay out of ther barn barclay out of ther barn1 barclay out of ther barn2 barclay out of ther barn3Barclay has been let down twice now as people offering to adopt then cannot do so.  He needs a home.  People, will you help me make 2015 a successful “adopt a dog” year – starting with Barclay?

Things I learnt today

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We all learn something new every day – no matter how insignificant it may seem. Each new experience builds one more block to the new improved you to carry to the future

Omnigenous

My sister is pretty darn good at drawing stuff

Bollinger bands are trending indicators which can be used to measure volatility in a stock market, among other things.

Trading ten Forex combinations based on a single, sudden movement is a very bad idea, no matter how many confirmations you get from various charts.

Shanghai gets much colder than I was promised two years ago.

Turn Left, Turn right, Go straight in Chinese – Zuo3 zhuan3, you4 zhuan3, zhi2 zou4

Imagination in Chinese – Xiang3 Xiang4 Li4

I can use my commute to work to memorise up to 4 phrases permanently in Chinese

Cats only take 8 weeks to develop and birth kittens

I can use my so far unused fridge-sized box as a cat home/bed/litter area/toy

Sunflowers stalks and leaves stay alive much longer than you’d think after decapitating the head and not watering it for days on end.

Taizhou…

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Get your dog through ‘Fireworks’ ….8 tips I can share

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There are many things that frighten our pets but none so deliberate as Fireworks.

Bonfire / Guy Fawkes night, birthdays, Chinese New Year, Diwali, Thanksgiving, New Year’s Eve and more… Yet whilst many of us are ooo-ing and aaah-ing at the pretty spectacular our poor pets are often beside themselves with utter panic.
You see, it’s not just the flashes. It’s not just the bangs. One thing I never realised – and I bet you didn’t – it’s the vibration!

Animals are tuned into nature.
Flashes = lightening = storms = look for safety. Bangs are the same = thunder. The vibration through the air all but sends them insane as their sensitive ears AND bodies pick up this unknown phenomenon.

Just imagine (or remember) something you have never done before – going on a plane for the first time, going in a glass lift when you’re nervous of heights, your first driving lesson, even perhaps a roller coaster ride. The first time you do something like that your heart races, your pulse pounds in your ear, you feel slightly nauseous, yet you know that at any point you can stop what you’re doing.

Well for our dogs they have all of those feelings of fight or flight but no real comprehension – they DON’T KNOW it won’t hurt them, or that it isn’t a massive storm rolling in… they can’t understand and they can’t stop it happening.

I have learned that we have to understand them and work with them to a more comfortable situation.

There are many dogs who never fret and that’s usually because their experience of such ‘danger’ was dealt with matter of fact and calmly. Most though have some degree of discomfort with the whole fireworks idea.

Having adopted 2 Romanian rescued dogs I see both sides. Tess, the newbie at 6 month before her first exposure simply chewed her chew or slept through each night – only a little anxious when she desperately needed to go out to pee and someone set offf a loud banging firework. To counteract this, AS SOON AS SHE’D DONE HER BUSINESS we got her in and instructed her to sit on her mat. No treat, no fuss, just back to the mat with her chew toy. If we’re not bothered she isn’t. We did not leave her out any length of time to become agitated.

Now for the big baby Annie, coming up to three years of age. She was 9 months before she was rescued and had lived out on the cold streets, in fields in storms, no pack, no protection, then months in a public shelter and UK kennels. She came to us terrified of everything. Rustling leaves sent her into a panic, cars going by freaked her out… even the TV caused a panting and hiding effect the first week we had her. So no surprise Fireworks send her panic rating off the scale.
I didn’t want to have a constantly drugged up dog every time celebrations were afoot so I investigated, google, read books, took advice from vets and friends with experience and now I share to you to see if you and you dog can benefit.

1) DON’T tell you dog he/she is a good dog when they come to you for reassurance. This, I have learned does not as we think reassure. It reinforces that fear is good. The exact opposite to what we want to achieve.

2) DON’T try treats and food to calm your dog down unless they would normally be having food at the time. Again, treats for nerves say it’s ok to be nervous. Plus, if you dog is very upset it’s likely to give them stomach pains too.

3) DON’T EVER shout at your dog even if they go toilet inside or go into a room that is “out of bounds” … They are not using their knowledge they are using their instinct and fight or flight = release bladder/bowels and hide if you can’t run. We’ve all heard the saying “so scared he pooed himself (or variants of)”. Well that’s EXACTLY what happens to your dog.

4) DO act as normally as possible, no extra fuss, no treats etc UNLESS your dog is comfortable with that. What you do want to do is say “hey I’m here, you’re safe” but without the “it’s ok to panic” message.

5) DO try and walk your dog, a long walk or good runaround before dusk when you are expecting fireworks to happen. Exercise not only settles them, but sends a calming hormone round the body and so stress levels are zero to start with. A stressed dog to start with will be hyper-stressed later.

6) DO try and invest in a Thundershirt if you can. It will not work for all dogs but I went through literally hundreds of reviews before I paid a hefty £40 out and the majority (I’d say 98%) said it worked for their pet. It works for Annie. Basically it wraps around them like swaddling a baby and they have a sense of security from it. I would recommend it.

7) DO look at using technology such as DVD’s and CD’s that are available playing sounds to desensitise your dog. You play a few minutes every day and your dog gets used to the noise. They work for many and come highly recommended but I had no success with Annie.

8) DO research and use herbal remedies. There are doggy versions of Kalms, diffusers to plug in, sachets of mixtures to put with food. They on their own will not probably solve the issue but combined with a steady routine, a Thundershirt, exercise and a place to hide, your dog should be a lot happier when coping with the fact that we think loud bangs and flashes are fun.

Last year Annie spent 3 weeks freaking out at everything that wasn’t quiet and ordinary each time fireworks were going off around us. This year we have had one night of panic (because I forgot the Thundershirt until fireworks had started). Last night – 2 weeks into the flashing and banging, Annie, no shirt, no herbs, just a long walk and a steady routine, just lay on her mat and dozed.!! SUCCESS with my baby girl does make me smile.
I hope you have some success with your furry friend without resorting to a trip to the vet, but if the vets it is, at least you tried.

https://www.thundershirt.co.uk/

Thundershirt

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=13043
for plug in diffusers

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=8098
for herbal tablets to calm.

http://www.soundtherapy4pets.co.uk/scary.html
sound therapy

Love your dog, keep your dog safe and you have a friend forever.