Yet ANOTHER good dog’s life put to risk…

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I sat browsing my facebook page, Joe’s legacy tonight and my heart stopped. Just over a year since our beautiful Border Collie died and I was faced with a spine chilling picture like this……………….

Right there on the page originally set up as tribute to Joe. There right in front of me on the screen was a beautiful Border Collie, not unlike my Joe in looks, sat on a vet table with a HUGE stick piercing right through his chest.

“OH MY GOODNESS, when will this stop?” I gasped.

The link is below.  Please – if you love dogs, even if you don’t own one, STOP using sticks as toys.  I have begged, posted, written all about it, there are facebook pages and websites, vets comments, newspaper articles, yet still people throw a stick, a harmless doggy game.  It’s NOT harmless.

I don’t know statistics but I’m sure they’re out there somewhere. The thing is, whether 1 in a hundred injuries from sticks or 1 in a million – ONE IS TOO MANY when it’s preventable by not doing it. Dog’s die – they break bones, they get ran over, they choke… there are things we cannot protect them from, but we can stop using sticks because we’re lazy, or thoughtless, or naive… there’s no hardship to take a ball, or a favourite toy and throw it.

I’ve said it before and I’ll repeat it “If you know a toy will harm a child you prevent the child from having it.  Why then do we ignore this common sense when it comes to our dogs?”

Please, look at the links – and at the very least think twice… and share if you care.

https://www.facebook.com/tierrettung.straubing.de/photos/pcb.1580550875512624/1580550652179313/?type=1&theater

Don’t let another good dog die needlessly.

Why pick a Romanian Rescue? – It was the “song” that played on the heartstrings.

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I came across this wall poster on yet another Rescue site on Facebook yesterday and there’s a lot of truth in it. Since looking for another dog to go with Annie (a Romanian Rescue) after Joe’s death I have spent weeks spiraling around a head-spinning array of sites for fosters required, adoption required, rescue this, rescue that… It’s mind-blowing to say the least.

Now, I had to make a decision.  As someone said recently “Taking in one dog won’t change the world, but it will change THE DOG’S world”.  So, I couldn’t go about trying to change the world per se, but I most definitely could change the world for one dog. I trawled quite a few sites, both UK and abroad – Spain, Cyprus, Romania, Spain again, Romania, UK, Romania…. One site stuck out – for me.  A lady who was a teacher by day and a carer for over 100 dogs by night/spare time had her story. It was no worse than some others I’d read, but when I read that she’d just taken in 18 pups barely 8 weeks old, that would have been put to sleep, I felt the tug.

We all get it at some point in life.  Not always about animals. Sometimes it’s children or elderly or disable people, or gardens, or buildings, or old cars … something somewhere hits a note in the heart that sings just slightly louder than the melee of other notes and there’s the tug. Some call it passion, some a calling, but whatever name you choose it’s that defining moment that leads you in a different direction from the one you intended. That’s also the point we can choose to ignore what we know and carry on our merry way, a pang of guilt or doubt or a 2nd thought soon wiped away by life itself and it’s forever busy goings on.

Sometimes we don’t ignore it, we’re tugged closer, pulled into the outstretched arms of the melody that begins to rise from that one different note.  We look, we search, we ask, we read – each time knowing that the more we know the more we’ll be dragged deeper into the song.

When I saw the pups, barely old enough to be away from their mum, I wanted to help.  After all, what animal/dog lover can turn their head from a babe in need, especially those of one of the species of animal that truly does just bond with man on a whole different level? Practically,  I couldn’t do a huge amount, I couldn’t house them all, pay a fortune for care or drive over and rescue the lot, but tiny stones dropped in a pond make a foundation on which someone can stand one day. I sponsored and offered to foster one (Maiya) , and said I’d adopt another (Tess) to have as a playmate for my Annie as was the original reason I was looking.

Maiya enjoys a chew

Maiya from a public shelter was to be put to sleep if nowhere could be found for her and 17 other pups

tess 8 wks

Tess when she was first rescued from a Gypsy cellar with her siblings who were all kept in the damp and the dark.

It didn’t seem much but the money I paid for both to be transported to the UK, plus the sponsorship money, paid for food for them and a lot more besides.  All of the medical costs for vaccines etc was included in the adoption pack for Tess and I could have avoided costs for Maiya (fosterers don’t pay these the charity does) but that note in my heart twanged regularly and I didn’t mind paying a bit extra.

All but 2 of those pups are now in safe, happy homes across Europe as fostered or adoptee pets. The success of this drive is testament not only to those who’s heart played a specific note that they could not ignore but also to the woman who took them in, loved them and made them ready to leave, whilst still caring for another 100+ dogs, working as a teacher in a school and being a wife and a human being to boot.

Why didn’t I ignore it all when there are thousands of dogs in UK rescues?  Simple answer is: – the UK rescue centers have many volunteers not just 3, they have a lot of ‘press’ and reasonable funding, some even from the government, and the dogs here are safe already.  Many people adopting a pet will go to RSPCA or the like, or even a local place: that’s the first place they’ll look. We did the same with Joe and Annie. The issue with Romania is longstanding and is now becoming known but has been overlooked to the point of utter meltdown for dogs.  The UK is well known as a country of dog lovers, there’s plenty of love to go around.

In Romania dog lovers are rarer as most people see these animals as vermin and starve them, hurt them beyond what we could imagine and then leave them to die. At the very least the country is so over-run the population is exploding ridiculously. A massive neuter drive is also happening but it can’t keep up.  Years ago dogs were loved in the country but social and economical happenings changed people’s lives and attitudes and dogs went feral.

I can’t save them all but so far I’ve saved 3…and that is reason enough for me.

My story is for the one that struck that note then struck the chord, the chord became a song I could not ignore – I still sponsor with the few pounds spare and Barclay and Sophie are among the many that need to be taken out of that dog hating trap called Romania – but for the animal lovers of this world that’s a whole other story.

If you as a reader have an interest (and if you don’t you won’t have got this far) then take a look at the links for Barclay and Sophie and go from there – Maybe your song will begin too.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.677382875677732.1073742294.580398328709521&type=1&l=ca936e704c

Joe’s story…………….

https://mrsskeats.wordpress.com/2013/12/28/dont-let-another-good-dog-die-needlessly/

Joe died but his death is still carrying a message

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It’s 19th June 2014. Joe died 6 months ago on 23rd December 2013.

Joe was a 6 year old beautiful boy taken from us after only 10 months by a cruel twist .. an accident .. lack of information .. so I started a mini campaign.  And I’ve just read about another poor soul, a friend of a friend, having to wait to see if his dog will survive a stick injury.  Heartbreaking.

Ok so writing about it channelled my grief but the whole thing goes beyond that.

What was to be thought a rare freaky accident turned out to be all too familiar to vets and families worldwide.  What was thought to be a personal kick in the nuts turns out to be a case of ignorance is most definitely not bliss.

I received hundreds of comments on my first post after Joe died. I received hundreds of facebook and twitter comments too.  The current WP views are at over 139000 which is great, and yet not enough.  Dogs are still being treated for nasty stick injuries, vets see a few each month.  I can’t preach and stay stop it, but I can let anyone and everyone who cares know what a potential danger stick throwing is: better than being totally ingnorate of the risks.

What happened to Joe, and happens to dogs all over the world at a frighteningly all to often occasion was borne of ignorance, stupidity, even years of  “that’s what we do with dogs”.  We simply never thought about the consequences it could bring.

Historically, when man decided to have dogs as pets and not merely working companions (not all that long ago in the UK) chasing a stick was a favourite game.  We’ve all seen the old adverts in faded yellows and reds with a boy, stick in hand and his faithful dog pantng happily as he waits for the ‘toy’ to be thrown.  Why should we think it’s dangerous? We see things like celebs on the One Show with their dog, happily throwing it a stick, or in videos…. Dogs and stick throwing seems synonimous

These are but a few stories of reasons why we should try and change this……………..

https://mrsskeats.wordpress.com/2013/12/28/dont-let-another-good-dog-die-needlessly/

http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/local-news/dog-saved-stick-throat-scare-6645241

http://www.croftreferrals.co.uk/news  read Flick’s story

The list goes on.

Please think twice before you throw a stick for your dog to chase.

In memory of a beautiful dog, whose life will not ever have been in vain, but will mean so much more if we save others from pain.

In memory of a beautiful dog, whose life will not ever have been in vain, but will mean so much more if we save others from pain.

 

Drop and roll doggy

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Well, I think my doggy Annie is on fire – not in the quick learning kinda way.  Two walks this weekend and she’s practiced her “drop and roll” technique so much.. and it stinks…

Fox poo in mud = “ooo we’ll roll in that”.  Bird poo in mud = “oh yeah, that too.”  Oh and look – some dog pee on the path.  MUST drop and roll in that too.

Why do dogs do that?  I walked my lovely fluffy dog with her coat on, luckily, as she would have been covered (it’s easier to wash the coat!).

So there may not have been a fire but if ever there is, my Annie Baby will be ok if it gets her

Butter would melt in her mouth ......

Butter would melt in her mouth ……

, as long at there’s poo around too.

 

Don’t let another good dog die needlessly

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This page is set up as a memorial and as a legacy for Joe- Boy, a lovely collie dog rescued by us and loved by us until a freak accident took him away.  We intend to stop as many people as we can, and as many dogs as we can, from suffereing as we have.

Joe LOVED sticks! Joe would dance in front of one he had rooted out from somewhere.  His eyes were bright, his paws would pad the floor and he couldn’t wait to chase the wood.  Mostly I’d kick it along the floor but at times people would throw it and he’d gleefully chase, find and return until he could barely breathe, he’d ran around so much.  Then home for a long sleep.

From the first day we met him at FAITH Animal Rescue, in Norfolk, he chased sticks.  We walked along a country lane to see if we ‘liked’ him.  He didn’t care – where’s the stick? He won our hearts and we found a stick, threw it and won his.

Joe was already around 6 years old, a beautiful face with pale brown eyes and an adorable grin.  He’d obviously been used to sticks.  Perhaps a million times he’d chased after an innocent looking peice of wood.

22nd of December 2013 that changed!

Joe was out with his adopted sister Annie and a family member.  The stick was thrown, once, twice, twenty times…. then disaster fell like a sword, cutting short the fun, and very soon his life.

Joe caught the stick as it fell, it went down his throat, ripped his windpipe….Joe collapsed.  He managed to get up and the family member got him home.

A trip to the vets, 3 times in 36 hours, £700 later we were still unable to save him.  It was too much, the pain too bad.  He lost his strength, lost his will and one and a half days after he caught his last ever stick, he left us.

Now, if EVERYONE who can to post this line on their timeline on social media or via blogs does so, whether you have dogs or not, you will HELP me, in Joe’s name to save another dog, and another family from going through the pain.

Use a proper toy with your dog and keep your best friend with you for longer… and please don’t think “It’ll never happen….” it does…., it has …… but we can stop it from happening again.  PLEASE pass this message across the world.  I’ve had almost 500 shares on FAITH Animal Rescue facebook page alone – that’s potentially 500 dogs and families saved from the agony or this situation.  Every share of the message may prevent just one more…………………….Imaget